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Research (Published online: 08-01-2017)

3. Effects of different vegetable oils on rumen fermentation and conjugated linoleic acid concentration in vitro - Amitava Roy, Guru Prasad Mandal and Amlan Kumar Patra

Veterinary World, 10(1): 11-16

 

 

   doi: 10.14202/vetworld.2017.11-16

 

Amitava Roy: Department of Animal Nutrition, West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, Belgachia, Kolkata - 700 037, West Bengal, India.

Guru Prasad Mandal: Department of Animal Nutrition, West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, Belgachia, Kolkata - 700 037, West Bengal, India.

Amlan Kumar Patra: Department of Animal Nutrition, West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, Belgachia, Kolkata - 700 037, West Bengal, India.

 

Received: 30-05-2016, Accepted: 08-12-2016, Published online: 08-01-2017

 

Corresponding author: Guru Prasad Mondal, e-mail: gpmandal1@gmail.com


Citation: Roy A, Mandal GP, Patra AK (2017) Effects of different vegetable oils on rumen fermentation and conjugated linoleic acid concentration in vitro, Veterinary World, 10(1): 11-16.



Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of different vegetable oils on rumen fermentation and concentrations of beneficial cis-9 trans-11 C18:2 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and trans-11 C18:1 fatty acid (FA) in the rumen fluid in an in vitro condition.

Materials and Methods: Six vegetable oils including sunflower, soybean, sesame, rice bran, groundnut, and mustard oils were used at three dose levels (0%, 3% and 4% of substrate dry matter [DM] basis) in three replicates for each treatment in a completely randomized design using 6 × 3 factorial arrangement. Rumen fluid for microbial culture was collected from four goats fed on a diet of concentrate mixture and berseem hay at a ratio of 60:40 on DM basis. The in vitro fermentation was performed in 100 ml conical flakes containing 50 ml of culture media and 0.5 g of substrates containing 0%, 3% and 4% vegetable oils.

Results: Oils supplementation did not affect (p>0.05) in vitro DM digestibility, and concentrations of total volatile FAs and ammonia-N. Sunflower oil and soybean oil decreased (p<0.05) protozoal numbers with increasing levels of oils. Other oils had less pronounced effect (p>0.05) on protozoal numbers. Both trans-11 C18:1 FA and cis-9, trans-11 CLA concentrations were increased (p<0.05) by sunflower and soybean oil supplementation at 4% level with the highest concentration observed for sunflower oil. The addition of other oils did not significantly (p>0.05) increase the trans-11 C18:1 FA and cis-9, trans-11 CLA concentrations as compared to the control. The concentrations of stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids were not altered (p>0.05) due to the addition of any vegetable oils.

Conclusion: Supplementation of sunflower and soybean oils enhanced beneficial trans-11 C18:1 FA and cis-9, trans-11 CLA concentrations in rumen fluid, while sesame, rice bran, groundnut, and mustard oils were ineffective in this study.

Keywords: conjugated linoleic acid, goat, rumen fluid, vaccenic acid, vegetable oil.



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