Veterinary World

 

ISSN (Online): 2231-0916
 

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Copyright: The authors. This article is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0) which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.


Research

8.    Examination of the content of heavy metals using hair samples in dogs of urban areas of Macedonia - Elena Atanaskova, Goran Nikolovski, Igor Ulčar, Vangelica Enimiteva
Vet World. 2011; 4(8): 368-370

 

doi: 10.5455/vetworld.2011.368-370



Dogs can be very good indicators for the environmental pollution. They share the same environment as humans and are exposed to action of the same pollutants. Contamination of the environment with heavy metals is performed by emissions of different origin, especially present in the urban areas. That is why it was great advantage to analyze the heavy metal levels in dogs from several urban areas in Macedonia. The objectives of this study were examination and analyzing the content of two heavy metals: cadmium and lead in dogs. For these purposes dog's hair samples were used. Samples were collected from 35 dogs from different localities. They were analyzed using the method of atomic absorption spectrometry. Statistical data processing was performed. Mean lead level in the hair samples from Veles, Bitola and Prilep were: 930.15, 715.66 and 525.63 g/kg; while for cadmium were: 54.28, 42.65 and 27.82 g/kg respectively. According to reference intervals for hair elements all the values are in normal ranges (for Cd <100 g/kg, and for Pb<2000 g/kg). Comparison of the results between these areas showed significance in arithmetic means (<0.05) between Veles and Prilep for Pb and absolute significance (<0.001) in arithmetic means for Cd between Veles and Prilep. The study presents the need for further research in this area, using dogs as bioindicators.

Keywords: atomic absorption spectrometry, heavy metals, dog's hair.