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Research (Published online: 17-01-2017)

10. Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasitism in small ruminants in western zone of Punjab, India - E. Singh, P. Kaur, L. D. Singla and

M. S. Bal

Veterinary World, 10(1): 61-66

 

 

   doi: 10.14202/vetworld.2017.61-66

 

E. Singh: Department of Veterinary Parasitology, Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Ludhiana - 141 004, Punjab, India.

P. Kaur: Department of Veterinary Parasitology, Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Ludhiana - 141 004, Punjab, India.

L. D. Singla: Department of Veterinary Parasitology, Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Ludhiana - 141 004, Punjab, India.

M. S. Bal: Animal Disease Research Centre, Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Ludhiana - 141 004, Punjab, India.

 

Received: 18-08-2016, Accepted: 09-12-2016, Published online: 17-01-2017

 

Corresponding author: P. Kaur, e-mail: ralhanvet@gmail.com


Citation: Singh E, Kaur P, Singla LD, Bal MS (2017) Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasitism in small ruminants in western zone of Punjab, India, Veterinary World, 10(1), 61-66.



Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasitism in small ruminants in relation to various risk factors in the western zone of Punjab.

Materials and Methods: During the study, 603 fecal samples (391 of sheep and 212 of goats) were examined qualitatively by floatation and sedimentation techniques, and quantitatively by McMaster technique.

Results: Out of the 603 fecal (391 sheep and 212 goats) samples examined, 501 were found positive for endoparasitic infection with an overall prevalence of 83.08%, consisting of 85.16% and 79.24% in sheep and goats, respectively. Egg per gram in sheep was apparently more 1441.8877.72 than goats 1168.5778.31. The associated risk factors with the prevalence of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) parasites showed that females (85.97%) were significantly more susceptible than males (69.23%). Age wise the adults (>6 months) were significantly more prone to parasitic infection as compared to young ones (<6 months). Seasonal variation was recorded throughout the year and was significantly highest during monsoon (90.10%), followed by winter (83.84%) and summer (78.35%).

Conclusion: The study revealed an overall prevalence of 83.08% of GIT parasitic infections in small ruminants constituting 85.16% in sheep and 79.24% in goats in the western zone of Punjab. The most relevant risk factors for the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasitism in ruminants were sex, age, and season.

Keywords: gastrointestinal parasitism, goat, prevalence, Punjab, sheep, western zone.



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