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Copyright: The authors. This article is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0) which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.


Research

5.    Haematological and blood biochemical profile in lactating buffaloes in and around Parbhani city - S. D. Hagawane, S. B. Shinde and D. N. Rajguru

Veterinary World 2(12):467-469

 



Forty buffaloes in early, mid and late lactation with a drop in a milk production were screened for haematological and blood biochemical profile. In early stage of lactation haemoglobin concentration showed lowered trend as compared to recorded means in other groups of lactating buffaloes.  The mean value of TLC in dry pregnant group of buffaloes was 10.05 0.89 X 103 /cmm showed slightly higher trend than the normal healthy control group. The blood glucose was significantly higher in dry buffaloes (52.724.22 mg/dl) than the early and late lactating buffaloes (48.233.44 mg/dl). During early stage of lactation the serum total protein values (8.360.47 g/dl) was slightly elevated than the normal healthy control (8.000.57 g/dl). The urea nitrogen values differ significantly (P<0.05) amongst different groups of lactating buffaloes. The descending trend in the serum cholesterol concentration in dry pregnant buffaloes compared to lactating buffaloes was observed. There was drop in calcium level during early stage of lactation (8.190.83 mg/dl) than the normal healthy buffaloes (11.210.19 mg/dl). As the stage of lactation progresses the serum calcium level increased. Serum magnesium concentration in various groups of buffaloes did not differ significantly. Early lactation showed highest susceptibility for ketosis and hypocalcaemia. The metabolic disorder associated with hypophosphatemia was significantly high in dry (advance pregnant) buffaloes.

Keywords: glucose, total proteins, BUN, cholesterol, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium.