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Research (Published online: 29-11-2016)

25. Steroid and metabolic hormonal profile of porcine serum vis--vis ovarian follicular fluid - Soumen Naskar, S. Borah, Y. Vashi, R. Thomas, D. K. Sarma, J. Goswami and S. K. Dhara

Veterinary World, 9(11): 1320-1323

 

 

   doi: 10.14202/vetworld.2016.1320-1323

 

Soumen Naskar: ICAR-National Research Centre on Pig, Guwahati - 781 131, Assam, India; ICAR-Indian Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology, Ranchi - 834 010, Jharkhand, India; snrana@gmail.com

S. Borah: Department of Physiology and Biochemistry, Lakhimpur College of Veterinary Science (AAU), Lakhimpur - 787 051, Assam, India; sbsborah06@gmail.com

Y. Vashi: ICAR-National Research Centre on Pig, Guwahati - 781 131, Assam, India; yoyavashi@gmail.com

R. Thomas: ICAR-National Research Centre on Pig, Guwahati - 781 131, Assam, India; thomasrlpt@gmail.com

D. K. Sarma: ICAR-National Research Centre on Pig, Guwahati - 781 131, Assam, India; dksarma1956@gmail.com

J. Goswami: Department of Veterinary Physiology, College of Veterinary Science (AAU), Guwahati - 781 022, Assam, India; jeetendragoswami@yahoo.co.in

S. K. Dhara: Division of Veterinary Biotechnology, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar - 243 122, Uttar Pradesh, India; sujoylab.office@gmail.com

 

Received: 09-05-2016, Accepted: 20-10-2016, Published online: 29-11-2016

 

Corresponding author: Soumen Naskar, e-mail: snrana@gmail.com


Citation: Naskar S, Borah S, Vashi Y, Thomas R, Sarma DK, Goswami J, Dhara SK (2016) Steroid and metabolic hormonal profile of porcine serum vis--vis ovarian follicular fluid, Veterinary World, 9(11): 1320-1323.



Aim: This study was conducted to understand whether serum level of the steroid and metabolic hormones may be indicative of their level in ovarian follicular fluid (FF) in porcine, and its influence on fertility.

Materials and Methods: Ovaries from pigs (n=32) of two genetic groups, namely, native (Ghungroo; n=16) and crossbred (Hampshire Ghungroo; n=16) were collected. Both the genetic groups comprised gilts (n=8) and sows (n=8), and sows were in luteal phase of estrus cycle. FF was aspirated from small, medium and large follicles, and centrifuged for the collection of supernatant for further analysis. Blood samples were collected from the same animals, and serum was separated. Hormones, namely, cortisol, T3, T4 and testosterone were estimated by radioimmunoassay. Two-way ANOVA was used for analysis of data considering genetic background (native or crossbred), stage of reproductive life (gilt or sow), and source of sample (serum or FF) as fixed effects.

Results: It was observed that all the hormones except cortisol differed significantly (p<0.01) based on genetic background. Stage of reproductive life and source of sample did not affect the studied hormonal level. Within the genetic groups, stage of reproductive life influenced T3 (p<0.01), cortisol (p<0.05) and testosterone (p<0.01) level in crossbred pigs as compared to T3 (p<0.01) only in native pigs. The level of T3 in serum, as well as FF, was higher (p<0.01) in Ghungroo gilts compared to sows. However, a reverse of this was observed in the case of crossbred pigs. The level of cortisol (p<0.05) and testosterone (p<0.01) was higher in crossbred sows than gilts in both serum and FF.

Conclusion: The study revealed that serum level of the steroid and metabolic hormones is indicative of their level in the ovarian FF. Further, varying level of steroid and metabolic hormones in pigs based on genetic background may be due to variation in body size, rate of energy metabolism and stage of (re)productive life.

Keywords: cortisol, follicular fluid, pig, serum, T3, T4, testosterone.



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